If you would like to see a video of a Robotic Rectal Cancer Resection procedure, Robotic Rectopexy for Rectal Prolapse procedure, TEMS (Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery) procedure, Large Bowel Obstruction Colonic Stent procedure, or Laparoscopic Removal of a Segment of Diverticulitis procedure - click here.

Warning - This is an graphic presentation of an actual surgery.

Robotic Rectal Cancer Resection

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  • Robotic Rectal Cancer Resection

  • Robotic Rectopexy for Rectal Prolapse

  • TEMS (Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery)

  • Large Bowel Obstruction,
    Colonic Stent

  • Laparoscopic Removal of a Segment of Diverticulitis

Robotic Rectal Cancer Resection

Another form of minimally invasive surgery on the abdomen uses a robot. At St. Mary we have the da Vinci Si, currently the most advanced operative robotic unit available. We are also the only colorectal surgeons performing this in Bucks County and one of only a few in the region.

The da Vinci benefits both the patient and the surgeon. For the patient, robotic surgery maintains all the benefits of laparoscopy. Additionally, the robot controls exactly how the laparoscopic ports move through the abdominal wall. This causes less trauma and, therefore, less pain. For the surgeon, the robot has two major benefits. The first is that the surgery is performed at an operating console that lets the surgeon see in three dimensions (3D). Laparoscopy is in 2D, equivalent to watching a flat screen TV, while 3D lets you see depth just as in real life. The second benefit is that the robot has three operating arms (as opposed to the surgeon who only has two). This allows additional maneuverability and better performance. Finally, the robotic arms have a range of motion better than that of the human hand. All of this means that the surgeon can do the most exacting operations with less pain, better visualization, and faster recovery.

The majority of our colorectal operations are performed using minimally invasive techniques. These techniques allow for less post-operative pain and a quicker recovery for the patient. Robotic Rectal Cancer Resection is one of the minimally invasive surgeries we offer.

Robotic Rectopexy for Rectal Prolapse

For both external and internal rectal prolapse, the rectum is resuspended in the pelvis to its normal anatomic position. Where appropriate, a bowel resection may be performed at the same time. Pelvic surgery is best performed robotically allowing the benefits of laparoscopy (small incisions, less pain) with a range of motion beyond that of the human hand. It also allows the surgeon to have three operating arms instead of just two. This surgery was performed using the Intuitive Surgical daVinci Si robotic platform.

TEMS (Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery)

Certain rectal polyps and cancers that would traditionally require an abdominal surgery to remove, can be removed transanally with special equipment. Like the robot, a binocular scope allows for 3D visualization, and specialized equipment allows the surgeon to remove the full thickness of the lesion and suture close the defect. This converts a hospital stay of up to a week into a same day surgery, with minimal to no pain. We are also the only colorectal surgeons performing this in Bucks County and one of only a few in the region.

Careful staging of the lesions is imperative, as this surgery is not always the best option for patients. Utilizing endorectal ultrasound, we carefully evaluate the lesions to see if this is an appropriate treatment option.

The majority of our colorectal operations are performed using minimally invasive techniques. These techniques allow for less post-operative pain and a quicker recovery for the patient. TEMS (Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery) is one of the minimally invasive surgeries we offer.

Large Bowel Obstruction, Colonic Stent

When a tumor obstructs the bowel, an emergency surgery is often indicated, often requiring a temporary or permanent colostomy bag. Sometimes, we can relieve the obstruction with a colonic stent, which opens up the blocked bowel similar to stents used for blocked vessels in the heart.

Laparoscopic Removal of a Segment of Diverticulitis

Using small incisions on the abdomen, we can perform most of the operations that normally would require a large incision on the abdomen. Pain is less than a large incision and your ability to get up and moving after surgery is much greater. Hospital stay is usually shorter and patients are back to their normal lives faster using these techniques.

The abdomen is filled with a gas (carbon dioxide) and high definition cameras are used to visualize everything inside the abdomen. Specialized equipment lets us manipulate the bowel and transect blood vessels, all through tiny holes that are about the size of a pencil eraser.

Sometimes a special port is used that allows a hand to be inside the abdomen to feel and manipulate bowel, while the other instruments use the laparoscopic ports. Regardless of technique, one incision has to be big enough to remove the specimen. This still leaves the patient with the largest incision usually around 3 inches long.

The majority of our colorectal operations are performed using minimally invasive techniques. These techniques allow for less post-operative pain and a quicker recovery for the patient. Laparoscopic Removal of a Segment of Diverticulitis is one of the minimally invasive surgeries we offer.